Historical Fantasies: Regency

Historical fantasy is one of my favorite subgenres, an awesome melting pot of historical fiction and fantasy. I even have a separate page listing the ones I’ve read! This feature will run for a few months, showcasing the major time periods I’ve read in. Goal: have a spiffy, updated page by the end!

Regency is one of the more popular eras for historical fantasy, which is why I’ve given it its own post. As always, if you know one I’m missing, let me know!

Joan Aiken’s Dido Twite series, starting with The Wolves of Willoughby Chase. Apparently I’ve only reviewed Nightbirds on Nantucket here, though I’ve read the whole series (middle grade; highly recommended)
The Peculiar and The Whatnot by Stefan Bachmann (middle grade; highly recommended)
The Magicians and Mrs. Quent by Galen Beckett (adult; not my favorite)
Kat, Incorrigible, Renegade Magic, and Stolen Magic by Stephanie Burgis (middle grade; highly recommended)
Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell and The Ladies of Grace Adieu (upper YA/adult; JS&MN is one of my favorite books eeverrrr)
Cold Magic, Cold Fire, and Cold Spirit by Kate Elliott (adult; recommended)
Keeping the Castle by Patrice Kindl is a sort of fantasy without fantasy (YA; recommended)
Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal (adult; not my personal favorites but lots of other people like them!)
Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series (adult; loved but haven’t re-read)
Sorcery and Cecelia and its sequels by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer (YA; I looove these books, especially the first)
Magic and Malice by Patricia C. Wrede (middle grade; good but not my favorite)
Magic Below Stairs by Caroline Stevermer (middle grade; good but not my favorite)

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3 Comments

Filed under bookish posts, reviews

3 responses to “Historical Fantasies: Regency

  1. Sorcery and Cecelia by Wrede and Stevermer! I didn’t like the other two books as well as the first.

    • Maureen Eichner

      I completely agree! (I put them in the list, but under “the Kate & Cecy books,” which may not make sense to anyone else.)

  2. You might well enjoy The Bewitching Season, by Marissa Doyle.

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